The Spectre of Alexander Wolf

The Spectre of Alexander Wolf

The Spectre of Alexander Wolf

An Irish Times Book of the Year 'It will stay with you for the rest of your life' - Nicholas Lezard, Guardian 'This is an original at work' - George Szirtes, The Times 'Quick-paced, taut prose ... rendered beautifully in Karetnyk's accomplished new translation' - Ivan Juritz, Independent on Sunday 'Elegantly eerie ... devastatingly atmospheric ... cool, wonderfully fraught' - Eileen Battersby, Irish Times 'A mesmerising work of literature' - Antony Beevor 'Truly troubling, a weird meditation on death, war, and sex... Bryan Karetnyk's new translation makes you believe in the power of the original' - Lorin Stein, Paris Review 'Coincidence, fate, guilt, redemption, love, death and melodrama are thrillingly interwoven with irresistible style and elegance' - Val Hennessy, Daily Mail 'Of all my memories, of all my life's innumerable sensations, the most onerous was that of the single murder I had committed.' A man comes across a short story which recounts in minute detail his killing of a soldier, long ago - from the victim's point of view. It's a story that should not exist, and whose author can only be a dead man. So begins the strange quest for the elusive writer 'Alexander Wolf'. A singular classic, The Spectre of Alexander Wolf is a psychological thriller and existential inquiry into guilt and redemption, coincidence and fate, love and death. Gaito Gazdanov (Georgi Ivanovich Gazdanov, 1903-1971), son of an Ossetian forester, was born in St Petersburg and brought up in Siberia and Ukraine, he joined Baron Wrangel's White Army in 1919 aged just sixteen, and fought in the Russian Civil War until the Army's evacuation from the Krimea in 1920. After a brief sojo

The Beggar and Other Stories

The Beggar and Other Stories

The Beggar and Other Stories

Translated for the first time, the best short stories by the 'modernist master' Gazdanov, author of The Spectre of Alexander Wolf In a Paris underpass, dirty and dressed in rags, stands a silent beggar. In the evening, he walks the deserted streets; at night, he sleeps in a small, foetid crate. He is poor and he is ill, but, on reflection, he is free. Translated into English for the first time, these six stories by modernist master Gaito Gazdanov draw on his own experiences as an exile in Paris. From the glamorous tale of a political agent setting sail from Marseilles to Constantinople, to a meditation on what it means to have - or to be - a father when a wayward stepmother is introduced, these lyrical stories have it all. Praised by Maxim Gorky, translated with intelligence and grace by Bryan Karetnyk, The Beggar and Other Stories shows the writer of The Spectre of Alexander Wolf at his very best. Gaito Gazdanov (1903-1971) joined the White Army aged just sixteen and fought in the Russian Civil War. Exiled in Paris from the 1920s onwards, he eventually became a nocturnal taxi-driver and quickly gained prominence on the literary scene as a novelist, essayist, critic and short-story writer, and was greatly admired by Maxim Gorky, among others. Pushkin Press also publishes the celebrated The Spectre of Alexander Wolf, The Buddha's Return and The Flight.

An Evening With Claire

An Evening With Claire

An Evening With Claire

The lyrical first novel of youth and love by acclaimed modernist master Gaito Gazdanov, author of The Spectre of Alexander Wolf Two old friends meet nightly in Paris, trading conversational barbs and manoeuvring around submerged feelings. Throughout the ten years of their separation, thoughts of Claire lingered persistently in Kolya's mind. As the imagined romance finally becomes real, Kolya is thrown into recollections of formative moments from his youth in Russia, from his solitary early years through military school and service in the White Army in the Civil War, all leading to this union with Claire. The first novel by the celebrated Russian master Gaito Gazdanov, An Evening with Claire is a lyrical, finely crafted portrait of a lost innocence and a vanished era.

The Flight

The Flight

The Flight

The flight (Polyot) was partially serialized in 1939 in Russkie zapiski, and originally published in its complete form in Russian in 1992.

Russian migr Short Stories from Bunin to Yanovsky

Russian   migr   Short Stories from Bunin to Yanovsky

Russian migr Short Stories from Bunin to Yanovsky

SHORTLISTED FOR THE 2018 READ RUSSIA PRIZE Imagine that many of Russia's greatest writers of the twentieth century were entirely unknown in the West, and only recently discovered in Russia itself. Strange as it may seem, it is in fact true, and their rediscovery is setting the literary world alight. Names such as Gaito Gazdanov and Vasily Yanovsky have excited great interest in Russia, and with stories of gambling, drug abuse, love, death, suicide, madness, espionage, glittering high society and the seedy underworld of Europe's capitals, their appeal is extremely broad. Many of these writers' works are only now being published in Russia for the first time, alongside those of leading contemporary authors - and to great critical acclaim. And we aren't just talking about two or three obscure authors; there are, quite literally, dozens of them.

Fandango and Other Stories

Fandango and Other Stories

Fandango and Other Stories

Fandango and Other Stories presents a selection of essential short fiction by Alexander Grin, Russia's counterpart to Robert Louis Stevenson, Edgar Allan Poe, and Alexandre Dumas. Grin's ingenious plots explore conflicts of the individual and society in a romantic world populated by a cast of eccentric, cosmopolitan characters.

The Buddha s Return

The Buddha s Return

The Buddha s Return

A millionaire is killed. A golden statuette of a Buddha goes missing. A penniless student, who is afflicted by dream-like fits, is arrested and accused of murder. Slipping between the menacing dream world of the student's fevered imagination, and the dark back alleys of the Paris underworld, The Buddha's Return is part detective novel, part philosophical thriller, and part love story.In typically crisp, unfussy prose, Gazdanov's delicately balanced novel is an irresistibly hypnotic masterpiece from one of Russia's most talented émigré writers. Gaito Gazdanov (1903-1971) joined the White Army aged just sixteen and fought in the Russian Civil War. Exiled in Paris from the 1920s onwards, he eventually became a nocturnal taxi-driver and quickly gained prominence on the literary scene as a novelist, essayist, critic and short-story writer, and was greatly admired by Maxim Gorky, among others. His 1949 novel The Spectre of Alexander Wolf was published by Pushkin Press to great acclaim in 2013.