Bundori

Bundori

Bundori

The sequel to the acclaimed novel Shinju again features detective Sano Ichiro as he trails a serial killer stalking feudal Japan. In 1689, an all-powerful shogun controls the state, surrounded by bitter machinations and political intrigues. When an ancient tradition suddenly and brutally reappears, Sano risks everything to bring the killer to justice. “Bundori is terrific. . . . So good you won’t want to put it down, even to get off a plane. . . . [Laura Joh] Rowland hits her stride as a writer who can deal equally well with the pacing of plot and the nuances of character development. . . . Rowland clearly knows how to build suspense and action, a talent that she demonstrates with great skill.”—New Orleans Times-Picayune “Bundori is one of those mysteries in which the itch to find out whodunit recedes before the pleasure of prowling through a different world.”—Washington Post Book World “Sano may carry a sword and wear a kimono, but you’ll immediately recognize him as an ancestor of Philip Marlowe or Sam Spade.”—Denver Post “A colorful pictorial style that conveys . . . excitement and . . . danger.”—The New York Times Book Review

The Boxers China and the World

The Boxers  China  and the World

The Boxers China and the World

In 1900, China chose to take on imperialism by fighting a war with the world on the parched north China plain. This multidisciplinary volume explores the causes behind what is now known as the Boxer War, examining its particular cruelties and its impact on China, foreign imperialism in China, and on the foreign imagination. This war introduced the world to the "Boxers," the seemingly fanatical, violent xenophobes who, believing themselves invulnerable to foreign bullets, died in their thousands in front of foreign guns. But 1900 also saw the imperialism of the 1890s checked and the Qing rulers of China move to embark on a series of shattering reforms. The Boxers have often been represented as a force from China's past, resisting an enforced modernity. Here, expert contributors argue that this rebellion was instead a wholly modern resistance to globalizing power, representing new trends in modern China and in international relations. The allied invasion of north China in late summer 1900 was the first multinational intervention in the name of "civilization," with the issues and attendant problems that have become all too familiar in the early twenty-first century. Indeed, understanding the Boxer rising and the Boxer war remains a pressing contemporary issue. This volume will appeal to readers interested in modern Chinese, East Asian, and European history as well as the history of imperialism, colonialism, warfare, missionary work, and Christianity. Contributions by: C. A. Bayly, Lewis Bernstein, Robert Bickers, Paul A. Cohen, Henrietta Harrison, James L. Hevia, Ben Middleton, T. G. Otte, Roger R. Thompson, R. G. Tiedemann, and Anand A. Yang.

Bundori

Bundori

Bundori

It is early spring, 1679, and the feudal Japanese capital, Edo, is beginning to blossom. But along its peaceful, misty streets evil lurks. With one stroke, the favored vassal of the ruling family is decapitated, his head taken for a bundori -- a war trophy. Sano Ichiro, the shogun's Most Honorable Investigator of Events, Situations, and People, is called to find the culprit. In a city where danger and deceit lie just below the lush surface, Sano must rely on his mind, his instincts, and his noble training in Bushido -- the Way of the Warrior -- to solve this case that could bring him glory...or everlasting shame. Set against a backdrop of sumptuous castles, tawdry pleasure districts, and serene temples, and filled with unforgettable, rich characters, Bundori is breathtaking entertainment.

The Bundori Murders

The Bundori Murders

The Bundori Murders

SAN FRANCISCO, SEPTEMBER 30, 1974 Early on a dark, fog-shrouded morning, Giuseppe Sorvino, the aged sexton of Saint Mary's Catholic Cathedral finds a strange object covered in a black cloth on the front stairs of the church. When he pulls away the veil, he is confronted by the face of death: a severed head staring straight at him. The shock is too much for the gentle old man's heart and he falls dead. For hardboiled, twenty-year veteran detective Keith Gallagher of the San Francisco Police Department's elite Homicide Detail, the grisly murder is only a prelude to the most difficult case of his career. At first, Gallagher is frustrated by a shocking number of similar homicides that terrorize the city, and the lack of any clue that could crack the case. However, things go from bad to worse as he struggles to end the reign of terror, all the while encumbered by the politics, political correctness, self-interests, and racial tensions that exist within the police department, forcing him into a struggle to maintain his own sense of ethics and humanity; and ultimately, to risk his life to protect the one person he holds most dear. This is the second exciting illustrated volume of the San Francisco Police Chronicles, by former police officer Hayato Tokugawa, continuing the saga of S.F.P.D. officers Brian O'Neil and John Kelly, Inspector Keith Gallagher and his Japanese-American wife Keiko, and Gaki Tachibana, which began with the first volume, Angel Dust. And like Angel Dust, The Bundori Murders is the real story of real people who lived, worked, and sometimes died on the streets of San Francisco.

The Michigan Alumnus

The Michigan Alumnus

The Michigan Alumnus

In volumes1-8: the final number consists of the Commencement annual.

Library Journal

Library Journal

Library Journal


Cassette Books

Cassette Books

Cassette Books